The war on coal is over.  Coal lost | Dana Nuccitelli

Coal can’t compete with cheaper clean energy. The Trump administration can’t save expensive, dirty energy.Last week, Trump’s EPA administrator Scott Pruitt announced, “the war on coal is over.” If there ever was a war on coal, the coal industry has lost. According to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, many old American coal power plants are being retired or converted to natural gas, and new coal power plants aren’t being built because they’ve become more expensive than natural gas, wind, and solar energy: The share of US electricity coming from coal fell from 51 percent in 2008 to 31 percent in 2016—an unprecedented change. New UCS analysis finds that, of the coal units that remain, roughly one in four plans to retire or convert to natural gas; another 17 percent are uneconomic and could face retirement soon.Two more coal plants to close in Texas. Believe that makes 12 this year nationwide: https://t.co/8n1kUQUJScI would do away with these incentives that we give to wind and solar. I’d let them stand on their own and compete against coal and natural gas and other sources, and let utilities make real-time market decisions on those types of things as opposed to being propped up by tax incentives and other types of credits that occurI will sue to stop the Trump Admin’s irresponsible and illegal #CleanPowerPlan repeal, which threatens NYers public health & environment. pic.twitter.com/utm5Q0VWrFThose who cheer the EPA’s move should remember that President Obama initiated the Clean Power Plan in 2015 in the face of Congress’s inaction on climate change. Without effective legislation to combat climate change, a future president could just as easily go down the path of executive action and regulations again. The best answer here is for Congress to pass legislation putting the market to work on solving climate change. Continue reading...